African Child


African Child

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When we tend to think of an African child, it is often associated with an image of a poor African child who is often ill or hungry. Whilst this is the sad truth for many, it would be wrong to believe that every African child has a life of misery. This is simply not the case. Whilst many African children have absolutely nothing in the world, many are very happy. This page is designed to depict the African child in non-stage managed moments, just caught on camera by amateurs. It is hard not to smile when watching these videos. Then just imagine how much more happy these children would be if you can find about 50p a day to help sponsor one of them and truly bring about a better future.


Although 50p a day may not sound much it will ensure that the African child you sponsor has books for school, for, whilst primary education in most African countries is free, books, pencils and paper have to be supplied by each child which is too expensive for most families. Your average African child loves school as they know that getting an education and being able to read and write is the only way to secure a decent future in countries where there is no welfare safety net. In fact, in countries like Uganda, where thousands in the north historically commuted to the towns each night for safety, your average African child will take their homework along with them to ensure it gets completed before the next school day.


Your 50p will also go towards ensuring the African child you sponsor has access to clean water preventing many childhood illnesses and also go towards making sure the child has at least one good meal a day and has access to proper health care. These are things we all take for granted, but we shouldn't, for this is the future. Make an Africa child happy today and consider taking out a child sponsorship program here.


Five heartbreaking challenges faced by African children in need of sponsorship


There are many challenges faced by children in Africa. Some of these complications are caused by problems as simple as not having the proper sanitation – toilets and washing facilities - a basic human right which we take for granted in the Western world. Many of the problems are entwined with long-standing social issues, which can only be targeted by a committed form of support rather than a one-off hand-out; something which child sponsorship can offer. Without wishing to over-simplify the issues faced by these children, here are five of the challenges they face:


The Aftermath of War and Conflict


In Sierra Leone, eleven years of civil war devastated large areas of the country and destroyed the means by which many made their living. Peace has been restored and long-term development plans are underway, but this is still the second poorest country in the world. When there are deep scars left from conflict, it can be difficult for children to settle into a routine of schooling and hard for families to feel safe enough to send them. Child sponsorship can provide psycho-social counselling and safe places for children, to help heal the scars of war more quickly.


Food


Many of the children in Africa in need of sponsorship face the twin challenges of hunger and thirst every day. Sierra Leone’s war-torn, recent history means that families have been left with little money to feed themselves and over 50% of children in this region are malnourished. Close to one third of infant mortality is caused by malnutrition, a shocking statistic when you consider the excess and wastage we are privileged to in the Western world.


In the majority of African countries where children can be sponsored, including Uganda, Niger, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania and Zambia, the people are traditionally agricultural. However, consistent poor harvests caused by drought mean that they frequently fail to grow enough crops for themselves, let alone a surplus which could be sold for income. Child sponsorship can help train farmers in new methods for growing crops, give children apprenticeships in new trades and provide insurance that even when food is scarce there will be something to eat.


Apart from food, the damage to any infrastructure that was in place in Sierra Leone before the war means that clean water is extremely rare, meaning water borne diseases such as tuberculosis and cholera claim lives on a daily basis. Many communities in countries like Kenya, lack even basic facilities such as latrines. Providing regular money for projects to build these changes and saves lives.


Medicine


Along with water borne disease, Malaria is rife in many African countries. Whilst instances of these diseases could be reduced through the installation of proper sanitation, water systems and anti-mosquito precautions, there will always be a need for treatment. For many though, this is simply out of the question. There is no NHS or medical insurance for children in need in Africa and medicine can be very costly, but child sponsorship can provide money for medicine. There are also medical problems caused by social issues, which rely on education in order to improve. Child sponsorship helps the wider community by providing HIV and AIDs awareness training and hygiene education.


Schooling is not a right for children in African countries. Even when basic medical needs are attended to and they are well enough to attend school, families may not be able to afford it. School may be miles away, too far to travel on foot without decent food or water. In some cases, children also need to have a uniform in order to be allowed to attend. Child sponsorship projects mean that children are provided meals at school and give them the money for proper equipment and clothing. Armed with an education, children will be able to take on better jobs and careers, earning money for the future generation and contributing to improving society.


Money


When money is scarce, children often have to work to support their families, or stay at home to look after younger siblings and run household chores whilst both of their parents work. Worse than this, many children in African countries are forced into child labour, which robs them of their childhood. Particularly bad are the cases of street children, in places such as Senegal, where so-called ‘schools’ force children to beg for daily quotas of money and rice, little of which goes to the children themselves. It is the generosity of people who support international aid agencies which can save children from these plights.


These are the top issues that face children every day in many African countries but the challenges that spiral out from these are too many to mention. However, sponsoring a child really does make a difference, not only to the life of the child you sponsor but the wider community. Choosing to make a regular commitment of your money and aid sets off a ripple effect with your child at the centre and really will change the way the world works. This is a guest post from Liz at World Vision UK.


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Chad

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A video about children in Chad who have no access to safe water together with details of their lives.

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A short video about Republic of Congo children at play together with facts and figures.

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A video documentary about the lives
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Ethiopia
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Inspiring videos of talented Ethiopian children dancing and singing with details of their lives.

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Information, facts and figures about life for children in Ghana today together with video images.

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Information about the lives of children
in Guinea where there are high levels of poverty.

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A video of Maasai children together
with facts and pictures about their
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A video introducing some children from Madagascar together with facts and figures about their lives.

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Malawi Child

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Facts about children living in Malawi together with pictures and video of them at home, school and play.

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Mozambique Child

Mozambique Child

Info, facts and figure about Mozambique children who attend the Schools for Africa Project.

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Namibia Child

These children from Namibia were asked if they knew any songs then put on a performance.

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Nigerian Child

Info, facts and figures about
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Rwanda Child

Rwanda Child

Videos, pictures and facts and figures about life for children in
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Senegal Child

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This video shows pictures of Senegal children at play and details daily life for children in Senegal.

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South Africa Child
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Facts, figures and a video about the
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Sudan Child

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A video documentary exploring life for children in the Sudan in pictures and images.

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Info and video of the challenges children face whilst growing up in the impoverished Swaziland Kingdom.

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Uganda Child

Children in Uganda

A video documentary together with facts and figures about children living in Uganda.

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Zambia Child

A video documentary together with facts and figures about children living in Zambia.

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Zulu Child

Zulu Child

A group of Zulu children putting on a street dance display in South Africa together with information.

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